PHOTO EYE: Letter By Letter

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Rhodes Crane & Rigging, Inc.'s Roger Baker uses a Grove Worldwide RT64C to remove the letters "WASH". 

The iconic letters at the top of the Washington Water Power Building disappeared in pieces last week as crews removed them for restoration. The work is one of a handful of Avista's projects in the area — they're also renovating Huntington Park, the Upper Falls Powerhouse and the Theme Stream Bridge — in preparation for the company's 125th anniversary and the 40th anniversary of Expo '74 next year. Baldwin Sign Company is restoring the letters with stronger steel structures, new acrylic letter faces and energy-efficient LED lights. The restored sign is expected to be back to light the skyline by next week.

Below are some photos as a work crew removed the signs facing the Monroe Street Bridge, last Wednesday, Aug. 28. Photos by Young Kwak.

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Baldwin Signs employees Jon Whipple, right, and Dave Kannerer guide the letters "ING," which are attached to a Grove Worldwide RT64C.  

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Workers remove the sign from the top of the Washington Water Power building. 

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Baldwin Signs Account Manager Brent Cunningham, left, and Rhodes Crane & Rigging, Inc.'s Roger Baker attempt to extend a stinger on a Grove Worldwide RT64C crane.

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Baker works on a stinger on a Grove Worldwide RT64C crane.

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Cunninham pulls a cable a Grove Worldwide RT64C crane to attach to a ball.

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Baker, left, and Cunninham attach a ball to a cable on a Grove Worldwide RT64C.

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Cunninham guides the letters "WASH," which are attached to a Grove Worldwide RT64C, to the ground. 

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