WW: Legal pot effort goes down in Ohio and Willie Nelson's surprising ignorance of pot

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"Buddie," the ill-fated mascot for Ohio's legalization campaign.
  • "Buddie," the ill-fated mascot for Ohio's legalization campaign.

The big pot news that came out of election night was Ohio voters rejection of a ballot initiative that would have legalized both recreational and medical marijuana.

Pro-pot groups were split on supporting the measure, which would have effectively established an oligopoly in the state constitution with 10 wealthy individuals having the sole right to grow pot for the new market. One of those individuals that would have been allowed to farm pot in the Buckeye State was Nick Lachey, a former member of a boy band and a reality TV star.

Despite the setback, marijuana legalization groups are undeterred.

“A proposal to make marijuana legal for adults and regulate it like alcohol has already qualified for the November 2016 ballot in Nevada, and similar measures are expected to qualify for the ballots in Arizona, California, Maine, and Massachusetts,” read a statement from the Marijuana Policy Project. “The measures do not include the widely unpopular ‘monopoly’ language included in the 2015 Ohio initiative that limited the commercial cultivation of marijuana to only 10 predetermined producers.”

“When it comes to the broader debate about legalizing marijuana, the defeat of Issue 3 won’t be a case of ‘as Ohio goes, so goes the nation,’” said Tom Angell, chairman of the Marijuana Majority, in a prepared statement. “This was about a flawed measure and a campaign that didn't represent what voters want. Tonight’s results — and the choices that inevitably led up to them — are especially sad for Ohioans who use marijuana and will continue to be treated like criminals for no good reason. And this is particularly heartbreaking for those who need medical cannabis to treat serious ailments.”

The Washington Post has a rundown of all the other states considering legalization measures from the most viable to the long shots.

The results of a new survey show that the Dutch, which have 40 years of experience with more-or-less legal pot, want even fewer restrictions on the drug.

New York magazine has a long article about country music legend and weed enthusiast Willie Nelson. It turns out that Nelson really doesn't know that much about weed. 

Although Vermont has decriminalized marijuana, that hasn’t stopped law enforcement from writing even more tickets for people possessing the drug.