Still no capital budget in Olympia, Senate vote on GOP health care bill uncertain, and morning headlines

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ON INLANDER.COM


NEWS: Depending on who you ask, a bill introduced in Congress will either save dams and ensure affordable electricity for the Pacific Northwest for generations to come, or is a "death warrant" for the remaining endangered salmon species that still return to the Snake River.

NEWS: Child advocates believe the new Washington state Department of Children, Youth and Families offers the chance to increase efficiency and effectiveness in what had been a disjointed process, with functions performed by multiple agencies prior to creation of the new department.

NEWS: The National Governors Association retreat over the weekend was marked by pushback against Trump administration policies and a White House leadership void on a range of issues including climate change and trade, as the nation's governors looked outward, not inward. (via New York Times)


IN OTHER NEWS

Records detail Seattle mayor's alleged sexual abuse of foster teen in 1984
Newly released records outline an Oregon Child Protective Services investigation concluding that Seattle Mayor Ed Murray had sexually abused his foster son in 1984, through charges were never brought in the case, the Seattle Times reports.

Health care bill vote uncertain as McCain recovers
It's not clear when the Senate version of a health care bill might be voted on after Sen. John McCain had surgery Friday that could take weeks to heal from, the New York Times reports.

But wait, there's more
While Washington state lawmakers passed an operating budget, they're still hammering out details for a capital budget, with water rights that were called into question by the state Supreme Court's Hirst decision a major hurdle for GOP lawmakers, and talk of overriding Gov. Jay Inslee's veto of a manufacturing tax cut,  the Seattle Times reports.

Sixteen days after the July 1 deadline for a statewide government shutdown was beaten by an 11th-hour agreement, the Washington Legislature is still attempting to figure out a capital budget in Olympia.
  • Sixteen days after the July 1 deadline for a statewide government shutdown was beaten by an 11th-hour agreement, the Washington Legislature is still attempting to figure out a capital budget in Olympia.