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Kavanaugh accuser testifies, WSU quarterback's accuser flooded with stories and other headlines

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DOUG MILLS/THE NEW YORK TIMES
  • Doug Mills/The New York Times

ON INLANDER.COM

NEWS
: Alyssa Bodeau accused former WSU quarterback Jason Gesser of unwanted sexual advances. Then her phone wouldn't stop buzzing with other #MeToo stories.

FILM: Julia Sweeney, known for her Saturday Night Live character, Pat, is mounting a comeback to show biz. Film editor Nathan Weinbender got a front row seat.

ARTS: Spokane's 10-year-old celebration of local art, Terrain, with deep connections to the city, is casting a big shadow. As it moves into its second decade, Terrain's founders must ask how to continue to grow without stepping on too many toes.

IN OTHER NEWS

The Senate reckons

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her while they were in high school, is testifying in front of the Senate Judiciary committee. (C-SPAN)

Her too
Julie Swetnick is the third woman to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct. In a statement posted to Twitter by Michael Avenatti, her lawyer, Swetnick says that during parties in the 1980s, Kavanaugh would get drunk, act inappropriately with women and would not take "No" for an answer.

In a statement released through the White House, Kavanaugh says these latest accusations are "ridiculous and from the Twilight Zone," and denies even knowing Swetnick. (New York Times)


In the club
Three men, who held no government positions, were swaying VA policy due to their connections to President Donald Trump, through his Mar-a Lago resort in Florida. Wednesday, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray was assured the men's influential relationship with VA Secretary Robert Wilkie has ended. (Spokesman-Review)

Cell phones in class?
Schools in Spokane largely leave it up to individual teachers to regulate students' cell phone use during class. While one recent study indicates students are often distracted by technology, working for an average of six minutes or fewer before switching tasks, some educators in Spokane are using creative ways to curb the use of personal devices in the classroom. (Spokesman-Review)

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