Scenes from the Dakota pipeline protests 

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Fog burns off as smoke from smoldering campfires lifts from the sunrise at the Sacred Stone Saturday morning Sept. 17, along the Cannon Ball River in North Dakota near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation.
Tracy Hsu from Elgin ND and her horse Ashley pause to take in the view and catch their breath.
Harrison Burnside who goes by "Trucking Bear" is a U.S. Army Veteran and full blooded Navajo tribal memeber. He rode his Harley Davidson motorcyle alone for two days twice from Fort Collins CO to the Sacred Stone camp along the Cannonball River in ND. "I might not have much to offer but at least I can add a body to the stand... make a stand with the protectors. I've already gone home but I came back again after the dog incident. I saw it on Facebook, that's the only news I trust."
Members of the Hopi tribe join the efforts of the Sacred Stone camp against the Dakota Access Pipeline and bring to light their own environmental issues.
Mounted on horseback, members of the host tribe The Standing Rock Sioux led the Native American Veterans March from the Sarced Stone Spirit resistance camp site to the ancestoral burial grounds that were desecrated by Dakota Access Pipeline bulldozers along highway 1806 near Cannonball North Dakota.
James Gilman Wildbear (center) Chairman of the Mohegan's Veterans Association drove nearly 32 hours the night before, from his home in Connecticut, to help lead the Native Veteran's March to the sacred ancestral burial grounds.
An estimated 7,000 "Protectors of Water" held camp with members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline at the Sacred Stone camp along the moonlit Cannon Ball River in rural North Dakota Saturday evening Sept. 17.
Men, women and children representing an estimated 280 Native American Tribes and indigenous peoples of the Americas including members of the host tribe The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, rotate throughout the night around the main campfire, singing, dancing and eating at the Sacred Stone non-violent "Protectors of Water" campsite near the Cannon Ball River.
"Haji" from Earth (L) and 16 year old Sam Phillips from Ashville NC help prepare lunch in the communnity kitchen on Sept. 18.
Gina Keltz and her family from Oakland CA hosted a supply drive, gathering tents, tarps and food then drove the supplies to the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp where she was helping to organize the camp’s temporary school for home schooled children.
Dayton Ohio resident Alexander Fred who was helping to organize a temporary school for home schooled children at the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp came to stand in solidarity with the Dakota Access Pipeline opposition “Water Protectors” and to fight the oppression of Indigenous peoples around the world.
South view from atop “Facebook Hill” of the “Water Protectors” Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp near the Cannon Ball River.
Hannah Gladstone (L) from Sacramento CA is of mix descent and considers herself an ally to the Indigenous community. She had felt an emotional draw to the camp and a spiritual connection to the land. For her, it seems really obvious that we have to drink this water. She said, “Water is life and we need to protect it because no one is going to do it for us.” After almost two weeks, she felt this movement has brought a lot of “amazing people” to one spot but what really scares her is the ongoing genocide of Indigenous people. Loretta Red Dog (R) from CA is an adopted Oglala Lakota. She dropped what she was doing in CA and plans to stay through the winter. The power or prayer and tradition at the camp have amazed her. “The Native people here have been so welcoming to allies and non-Native people… if you are here, we love you. You are here because you answered the call and you came.” She walks almost everyday to the front line to pray and take part in ceremonies. She feels American media may not be giving this the attention it deserves but the rest of the world is watching and we’re not going anywhere. “These people have been through so much and are still going through so much!” said Red Dog “The genocide is not over people. That’s what you don’t understand, the genocide continues everyday… for every single white person that wants to get involved,” she said, “study the treaties! Honor the treaties and water is life!”
Justin Rowland 21, an Oglala Lakota tribal member from the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation grew up at Wounded Knee. He arrived at the camp April 26, 2016 and has made 15 trips over the past five months back and forth to the Sacred Stone Spirit camp. He says, “This is water…it’s the most important resource we have."
Lena Frame 19 (R) Seminole Tribal member from Plantation FL and Paulino Mejia 20 (L) is Chorti Mayan from Central America who resides in South Florida came to be part of a Native movement and to protect the water. They help to maintain the small kitchen set up by members of the Seminole Tribe at the Sacred Stone Spirit Dakota Access Pipeline resistance camp along the west bank of the Cannon Ball River in rural North Dakota.
Spokane resident and Gila River Pima tribal member, Jacob Johns in front of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe Administrative building in Fort Yates North Dakota holding a letter from the the Executive Director of the tribe asking the Spokane City Council to pass a resolution in support of the Tribe's efforts to stop the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
A Southwest view from a hill top on the east side of the Cannon Ball River.
Travelers from far and wide take cars, trucks, vans and buses to camp in tents and teepees at the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp.
Nearly 300 flags from Native American tribes and other nations hung around the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp signifying solidarity in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.
Tianni Arrow from Norris SD signs the back of her canvas painting she just finished outside the Defenders of the Water School at the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp.
Lydell Talas 27 is half Black and half Hopi. He has traveled from Northern Arizona with other Hopi tribal members.
Mounted on horseback, members of the host tribe The Standing Rock Sioux led the Native American Veterans March from the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp site to the ancestoral burial grounds.
Teton Lakota Nation Spiritual Leader from the band of Crazy Horse, David Swallow (R) and his wife Nyla Swallow (L) both from Porcupine SD stop to rest along Highway 1806 in North Dakota.
Loretta Red Dog from CA, an adopted Oglala Lakota, marches, along Highway 1806 in North Dakota, with a raised fist, in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Earl DeLeon from Kona Hawaii flies his upside down Hawaiian flag along with his hat bearing the same message in front of the ancestral burial grounds that 11 days prior had been desecrated by workers of the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Lena Frame 19 (R) Seminole Tribal member from Plantation FL and Paulino Mejia 20 (L) is Chorti Mayan from Central America who resides in South Florida came to be part of a Native movement and to protect the water. They help to maintain the small kitchen set up by members of the Seminole Tribe at the Sacred Stone Spirit Dakota Access Pipeline resistance camp along the west bank of the Cannon Ball River in rural North Dakota.
Many handmade grassroots signs and banners opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline adorned the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp inhabitants cars.
Photojournalist Drew Bly from Los Angeles CA stops to pose from watching the sunrise over the Sacred Stone Spirit Camp resistance near the Cannon Ball river in rural North Dakota. Bly rode his fixed gear bike there from Salt Lake City UT in search of a story. He had heard about the conflict between the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the developers of the Dakota Access Pipeline and had to see for himself what was going on.
The morning sun illuminates the campsites of the remaining campers at the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp near the Cannon Ball river in rural North Dakota on Sept. 19. The camp has shrunk by nearly half of 7,000 supporters who joined the camp over the weekend.
International Super Heavy Weight Jiu Jitsu fighter Joe "Tomahawk" Tate of Arizona's Gila River Indian Community shows his Native Pride with his "Native Can't Fail" T-shirt.
A sign of the times. Street signs and a water tower near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribeal administrative headquarters in Fort Yates North Dakota are daily reminders that just down the road the Sacred Stone Spirit and Red Warrior resistance camps stand in opposition to the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline.
Spokane resident and Gila River Pima tribal member, Jacob Johns
A child's handwritten letter entitled "Water is life" addressed simply "dear friend" and dated September 15th, 2016 lies undelivered on the grass floor of the "Water Protectors" Sacred Stone Spirit restance camp's temporary school.
Shortly after sunrise
Many handmade grassroots signs and banners opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline adorned the Sacred Stone Spirit resistance camp.
September 17, 2016
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Members of the Hopi tribe join the efforts of the Sacred Stone camp against the Dakota Access Pipeline and bring to light their own environmental issues.