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Snow finally falls in the Inland Northwest, lawmakers can't agree on definition of 'wall,' and morning headlines

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ON INLANDER.COM

NEWS: Why a dispute between Spokane police and the civilian ombudsman is at a standstill.

MUSIC: Everyone is doing it, so we decided to join the fun, too. Here are our favorite albums of 2018.

IN OTHER NEWS

Let it snow
The first significant snowfall of the season has hit, and people everywhere are scrambling to shovel their driveways and figure out how to drive on ice again. Here's the bad news (or good, depending on how much you're still in the Christmas spirit): Another snow storm is coming. (KHQ)

Free speech radio
All of those college Republicans upset that political commentator Ben Shapiro's appearance at Gonzaga was cancelled can now listen to his radio show, The Ben Shapiro Show, on KXLY. (Spokesman-Review)

Planning ahead
By this time next year, a new 51-unit building for formerly homeless people should be open. Catholic Charities is just starting construction on the four-story building. (Spokesman-Review)

War of words
With lawmakers still at an impasse, the end of the government shut down may hinge on one question: What, exactly, is a wall? (New York Times)

A man looks through the border wall to the US side, in Tijuana, Mexico, April 29, 2018. With a partial government shutdown stretching past Day 5, the impasse over funding a wall at the southwestern border has highlighted the debate over effective border security, with a breakthrough possibly hinging on a semantic argument: What is a wall? - MEGHAN DHALIWAL/THE NEW YORK TIMES
  • Meghan Dhaliwal/The New York Times
  • A man looks through the border wall to the US side, in Tijuana, Mexico, April 29, 2018. With a partial government shutdown stretching past Day 5, the impasse over funding a wall at the southwestern border has highlighted the debate over effective border security, with a breakthrough possibly hinging on a semantic argument: What is a wall?

Lockdown central
In an era of school shootings, schools are constantly going into lockdown. But are those lockdowns themselves traumatizing kids? (Washington Post)