Trump stonewalls Democrat oversight, Midwest flooded, and other headlines


ON INLANDER.COM

WORLD:
A dead, beached whale found in the Philippines on Saturday had 88 pounds of plastic garbage in its stomach, an unusually high volume even with increasing waste buildups in the seas. The incident was also reflective of the broader trend: between 5 million and 13 million metric tons of plastic waste are added to the world's oceans every year, per a 2015 study. (New York Times)

NEWS: Afraid that the reintroduction of Lime scooters to Spokane could result in riders careening into pedestrians in Riverfront Park, the city wants to place speed limits on the vehicles themselves.


NEWS: Since marijuana was legalized in Washington state back in 2012, teen weed use dropped slightly. However, there is one subsection of teens who are getting high at higher rates than prior to legalization: high school seniors who work 11 or more hours per week week, according to a new study.

IN OTHER NEWS...

Stonewalling oversight
President Donald Trump's White House doesn't intend on cooperating with congressional committees investigating him and his affairs in the Democrat-controlled U.S. House of Representatives. Numerous requests for documents have gone unanswered. (Politico)

Midwest floods
Record-breaking floods that are slamming Midwestern states are heavily impacting farmers and ranchers who are already struggling to get by with increasing rates of bankruptcy, falling incomes and a business-crushing trade war pushed by President Donald Trump. (New York Times)


Financial dependency
Deutche Bank, the German multinational investment firm, and President Donald Trump have a complicated and fraught business history — including an episode where Trump exaggerated his net worth to obtain loans from the bank. Now, those relationships are under investigation by congressional committees and the New York attorney general. (New York Times)

Inspect yourself
The Federal Aviation Administration is facing criticism after the news broke that it delegated safety inspection duties on Boeing's new 737 MAX 8 — the plane model that has been involved in two catastrophic crashes in less than a year — to the company itself. As it turns out, the FAA does this all the time. (Seattle Times)

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