Welcome to the Neighborhood 

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Scenes and people from 11 distinct neighborhoods of the Inland Northwest, a supplement to the stories featured in a special neighborhood guide published in the July 28, 2016 issue.
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Dan Nailen
In Spokane's North Hill neighborhood, resident David Jacobs works to publish the Garlandium each month to keep his neighborhoods and visitors to the area from across town updated on the local happenings.
Dan Nailen
Artist Nate O'Neill is creating this mural outside the former Garland Drinkery, on the side of the Clock House. He views North Hill and its respective Garland District as a prime arts haven.
Dan Nailen
Swede's Fly Shop owner Allen Peterson relocated his business from West Central to the North Hill's Garland District in June this year. He says the area's artsy feel reminds him of Seattle's famous Fremont District.
Mitch Ryals
A camp of homeless men just beyond this blue jeep have set up in Browne's Addition's 125-year-old Coeur d'Alene Park, across the street from the historic Patsy Clark Mansion. Transient populations bother some of the neighborhood's residents, even though it's not against the law for them to hang out in the park.
Mitch Ryals
A view inside the historic Patsy Clark Mansion, built by famed architect Kirtland Cutter for its namesake coal mining magnate. Once an upscale restaurant, the manse is now home to law offices, and occasionally hosts special events.
Mitch Ryals
A historic home shrouded in a thicket of trees next to the Patsy Clark Mansion houses an eclectic home-museum called Gallery 1889. Resident David Red has lived in the house his entire life, saying of Browne's Addition and his residence: "This is my home. It's where I feel most safe."
Chey Scott
Many of Peaceful Valley's pioneer-style homes — built by Spokane's early working-class residents — have been restored in recent years and are home to large gardens, like this one on the corner of Main and Cedar.
Chey Scott
The neighborhood along the river, one of Spokane's oldest, boasts an eclectic mix of homes and lifestyles. Its residents today view Peaceful Valley a calm oasis, with an almost rustic charm, even though it's located in the heart of the city's core, just minutes from downtown.
Chey Scott
Charlie Greenwood spent a few years of his childhood in Peaceful Valley. Even when his family moved to the adjacent West Central neighborhood, he maintained his friendships in Peaceful Valley, and chose to buy a house of his own in the neighborhood back in 1970s, where he's lived since.
Blythe Thimsen
Christ the King Anglican Church in Chief Garry Park was instrumental in establishing the neighborhood's new community garden. The church donated use of its land for the garden plots after the adjacent Bemiss neighborhood's garden needed to be relocated.
Blythe Thimsen
The Chief Garry Park community garden opened for its first season in April. Resident gardeners can now be seen working side-by-side on their plots in the cool of the evening.
Blythe Thimsen
Chief Garry Park is home to Spokane's historic Felts Field airport, where famed pilot Charles Lindbergh once landed the Spirit of St. Louis in the 1920s. The airport and surrounding area is now a recognized historic district.
Laura Johnson
The historic Spokane Woman's Club in the heart of the Cliff-Cannon neighborhood has seen a major resurgence in membership of late. The 1910 building is currently undergoing needed renovations and restoration thanks to a big federal grant.
Laura Johnson
The overlook along Cliff Drive offers some of the most stunning views of the city below, but boulders placed there last year now discourage people from parking too long, causing noise and littering. The view here became publicly accessible to non-neighborhood residents when a through-road was opened back in the early 1930s.
Laura Johnson
Below the well-known scenic overlook of the city on Cliff Drive is the historic "Tiger Trail" stairs. The stairs run down the hillside along the Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, another historic landmark of the neighborhood. The gardens were restored and reopened in 2007, after its ruins were rediscovered in the aftermath of Ice Storm 1996.
Isaac Handelman
In the South Hill's Lincoln Heights neighborhood, along east 17th Avenue, the sprawling Wilbur-Hahn estate looms over the hillside. Vacant and currently listed for sale, the former home of documented eccentric Dr. Rudolph Hahn has a storied and spooky past.
Isaac Handelman
Across from the neighborhood's titular Lincoln Heights Village on 29th Avenue is Miller's Hardware, a South Hill staple that's been around for more than 50 years. Pictured here are friendly employees Selena Rima, left, and Cassandra Bullivant.
Isaac Handelman
The winding streets of Lincoln Heights, shaded by stately pines and leafy maples, give way to a mix of historic homes.
Wilson Criscione
East Central community leader Michael Brown, who heads the Eastside Reunion Association, says he's on a "mandate from Christ" to give back to his neighborhood, namely its youth. He runs a summer basketball camp for kids at East Central's Underhill Park, and plans to soon open a soul food restaurant where he'll hire and train a staff of mostly teens.
Wilson Criscione
This building in East Central's South Perry District used to be an automotive shop, but it went out of business about a decade ago. It became The Shop coffee shop around the same time the city renovated the South Perry streetscape. Some in the neighborhood now credit this place with spurring the revitalization of the rest of the district.
Wilson Criscione
The Tin Roof's Jim Hanley hasn't seen this much hope in East Central in six decades. He was a kid when the freeway tore through the neighborhood and knows how it affected businesses. Though Hanley would be proud to live in East Central either way, he's looking ahead to the future.
Jake Thomas
West Central neighborhood activist Kelly Cruz started volunteering with the local C.O.P.S. Shop six years ago. Most days, he fields inquires from residents wanting to fill out a police report, complain about a nuisance property, register their bike or seek other services.
Jake Thomas
Before she and her wife moved to the neighborhood, and later opened Batch Bakeshop in a historic building on west Dean Avenue, Mika Maloney was cautioned by others about moving to West Central. Yet she says in her experience people here are more friendly and welcoming than what one might expect of a "nice" neighborhood.
Jake Thomas
Jerry Gill, owner of Doyle's Ice Cream Parlor, has lived in the same West Central house all of his life. "Nobody was afraid to leave doors unlocked," he says, but that changed in the 1970s. Things have improved since then, and now he gets upset when people refer to the neighborhood as "Felony Flats." "It's usually people who don't live in the neighborhood. I'm not afraid to walk at night," he says.
Young Kwak
People have been living on the floor of the Latah/Hangman Valley since long before it was part of Spokane, yet this neighborhood, boxed in by steep hills on each side, is often overlooked unless you're watching it fly by out your car window on the bisecting Highway 195. As the crow flies, it's less than a mile from dense South Hill neighborhoods. But down in the valley, it feels like a city unto itself.
Young Kwak
Rows of crops and greenhouses dot the Latah/Hangman Valley neighborhood's Vinegar Flats, along with plant nurseries and other agricultural businesses. Only a couple of miles from downtown Spokane, these farms allow for a unique opportunity, says Brian Estes, manager of the Vinegar Flats Community Garden.
Young Kwak
The homes of the older Vinegar Flats area contrast with the brand new housing developments still rising from the hillside on the opposite end of the neighborhood. There, the Eagle Ridge community is reaching its final stages of development after nearly 10 years of construction. Though a new suburbia, Eagle Ridge's residents strive to create their own neighborhood feel, similar to its counterpart on the valley floor below.
Jacob Jones
Retired architecture professor Nels Reese, right, is the self-proclaimed best tour guide in Moscow. After 20 years of teaching urban development at the nearby University of Idaho, his eyes still light up when he talks about the Fort Russell Historic District. He leads numerous tours of the neighborhood each year, highlighting the "most pretentious, most well-designed, most memorable" homes.
Jacob Jones
This bubblegum pink Queen Anne-style home was once the residence of famous North Idaho children's author Carol Ryrie Brink. It's surrounded by an amalgam of other grand, historic mansions — in the styles of Colonial, Gothic, Eastlake and Neoclassical — within the boundaries of the picturesque neighborhood in northeast Moscow.
Jacob Jones
No photo, drawing, map or rendering of the Fort Russell stockade exists. Only this crude boulder with an almost mocking plaque marks the general location of the short-lived 1877 refuge. "Around 40 area homesteaders, frightened by rumors during the Nez Perce war, built a log structure here," the marker states. "After thirty days in the fort, they realized the local Indians were not hostile and returned to their farms."
Carrie Scozzaro
In Coeur d'Alene's Midtown neighborhood — whose boundaries are a bit more fluid, depending on who you ask — the parking lot of locally owned Runge Furniture is a visible spot. It's here you can find Fish Folks owner Dale Young, who sells his seafood product most Thursdays, year-round.
Carrie Scozzaro
"As a kid I always assumed Midtown stopped at Harrison," says Jeff Runge, whose grandfather started Runge Furniture in 1946 at Second and Indiana (generally considered downtown). Runge Furniture outgrew first one, then another downtown location, relocating in 1980 to Fourth, in Midtown, after a Rosauers grocery moved north of the freeway.
Carrie Scozzaro
Midtown is an eminently walkable, even bikeable neighborhood. Sidewalks run the length of Fourth and nearly all of Third, while bike lanes encourage riding. Speed bumps along the pedestrian-heavy Fourth Street corridor — where numerous thrift stores cluster, like Junk, pictured here — help slow the steady stream on this major arterial.
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Dan Nailen
In Spokane's North Hill neighborhood, resident David Jacobs works to publish the Garlandium each month to keep his neighborhoods and visitors to the area from across town updated on the local happenings.